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Angels in Medicine features physicians, nurses, physician assistants and other healthcare workers who reach people without the resources or opportunities for quality care, such as teens, the poor, the incarcerated, the elderly, or those living in poor or war-torn regions.

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Featured Articles

Daniel Cox, GFH co-founder Grounds for Health: Using Vinegar to Save Women's Lives

by Shyla Nambiar

Community health promoters initially mobilize the campaign to get women to the clinics, often putting a bullhorn on a truck and driving through the area to spread the word on upcoming screenings. One week before the campaign, GFH volunteers arrive at the site to train the local doctors and nurses. The entire exam itself takes only 10 to 15 minutes (more advanced cases are referred to a hospital). Seventy-five to 100 women are seen daily during the five-day screening period. . . . more

 
 

Project Access Home Pages Project Access: Coordinated Healthcare for the Uninsured Poor

by Shyla Nambiar

Project Access has been such a success that 13,000 out of 15,000 qualified county residents receive healthcare access now. Uninsured residents who enroll with Project Access are less likely to go to the ER and more likely to report being in good health than insured residents. . . . more

 
 

Volunteers Reaching New Heights: The Himalayan Health Exchange

by Shyla Nambiar

India's Himalayan country covers a rugged terrain dotted with stunning, snow-clad mountains, waterfalls, Buddhist monasteries, and Hindu temples. But villages here are often isolated from the rest of the world for seven months at a time by heavy snows and avalanches. Residents have no access to nearby healthcare and must walk long distances to get to a clinic.. . . . more

 
 

Other Recent Articles

Father Tom Streit Multiple Hurdles in Treating Lymphatic Filariasis in Haiti

by Zeena Nackerdien, PhD

Medical supplies rapidly dwindled as the staff treated thousands of hungry, dehydrated and wounded Leogane residents. It was the UND staff on the ground who facilitated the transformation of a local highway into a makeshift landing strip so that much-needed additional supplies could be flown in to save lives. Against a distant backdrop of debris and growing refugee camps, a number of medical teams worked feverishly to treat the traumatized residents. . . . more

 
 
 

Women for World Health president Denise Cucurny with patients and family in the Andes, 2007 Women for World Health: Saving the World, One Patient at a Time

by Shyla Nambiar

The nun brought the little orphan girl to the mission site in Ecuador. She had a cleft palate and needed surgery. After the successful surgery, the little girl returned three or four days later. She brought a picture of her class at school, with her in it. It was the only thing she had of herself, and she wanted the doctors to remember her by it. . . . more

 
 
 

Travel Log: Dr. Randall Jacobs and Medical Teams International in Uganda

An eight-year-old Congolese refugee arrived with extensive burns. The rebel troops killed his father and then poured boiling water on him. Part of his ring finger was badly damaged from a bore hole pump. We were able to shorten his finger and close the wound. He was so incredibly brave and did not complain for a moment. He expressed his thanks in French as he left. He was an amazing child. . . . more

 
 

Dr. Stoller consoles an infant prior to his hernia surgery Our Chance International: Ghana 2009

by Mary Lou Bernardo

What draws people to travel for almost 24 hours in order to work 12-hour days without compensation? "It just grounds me", said Jill Stoller, MD, a pediatrician from New Jersey and medical director for Our Chance International. . . . more

 
 

Nguyen Thi Phuong and her parents and grandmother. Orbis International: Eye Doctors Wing it to Volunteer in Developing Countries

by Pippa Wysong

 

Look, up in the sky, it's an eye hospital on a DC-10 airplane!

Its mission: to fly to poor parts of the world where eye care is desperately needed.

Read more here.

 
 

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