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Angel Sightings
September 5, 2008

 

Eight-year-old Michelle Abrahams looks at her changed face in a mirror held by nurse Karli Symigton after her operation.
Lubabalo Ngcukana / Daily Dispatch
Eight-year-old Michelle Abrahams looks at her changed face in a mirror held by nurse Karli Symigton after her operation.

Giving the gift of a smile

Even the security guard is moved by what is going on inside the theatre at Madzikane kaZulu Memorial Hospital.

“Oh my God, those people are wonderful,” she says as she directs me to the theatre where the 37-member Operation Smile team of specialist doctors and nurses have set up shop for two days.

“What a good thing they are doing for these poor people. I only wish God can bless them for their efforts.”

Last Friday and Saturday the doctors and nurses “hijacked” Theatre A at this hospital on the N2 in Mount Frere in the Transkei to “bring one smile at a time” – as their motto puts it – to 25 people, mostly children, who have cleft palates and lips.

Read the complete story on Daily Dispatch online, South Africa

 

Medical Teams International helping with India floods

While New Orleans flooding gets attention at home, Tigard-based Medical Teams International is scrambling to help victims of severe floods in northern India.

The flooding, caused by heavy monsoon rains, has forced nearly 3 million people from their homes, including about 500,000 still waiting to be rescued. The official death toll is fewer than 100, but humanitarian workers estimate hundreds more have died.

Medical Teams International is working with partners in India to provide medicines, clean water and nutrition packets for thousands of people a day. Makeshift camps are crowded, says Joe DiCarlo, the organization's emergency-relief director. "There is a huge risk of water-borne diseases," he says, "and potential outbreaks of malaria and cholera."

Read the complete story by Richard Read in The Oregonian

 

Baylor expands its fight against AIDS to Tanzania

School receives $22.5 million grant to open facilities

Baylor College of Medicine's International Pediatric AIDS Initiative will expand to a seventh African country — Tanzania — thanks to a $22.5 million grant from President Bush's effort to fight the disease globally.

The recently announced grant from the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief will allow Baylor to build two centers and satellite clinic facilities in the sub-Saharan country in East Africa.

"Tanzania is an ideal setting for this new program," said Dr. Mark Kline, a Baylor professor of pediatrics and the president of the college's pediatric AIDS initiative. "There is a huge unmet need for HIV/AIDS treatment, especially among children."

Read the complete story by Todd Ackerman in the Houston Chronicle

 

Dan Rosan delivering medicines to Nsambe village with Elias Makani who is a Ministry of Health pharmacy technican.
Daniel Rosan / The Harbus
Dan Rosan delivering medicines to Nsambe village with Elias Makani who is a Ministry of Health pharmacy technican.

Summer Stories - Daniel E. Rosan, Malawi

I am at the Partners in Health guest house in Neno, in the heart of Malawi's poor, mountainous border region, in the heart of Africa. Today, I rush through the ice-cold shower, notice the electricity is out again, and head to the hospital to spend the day with the pharmacy team delivering malaria medicines to health centers even more remote than we are.

That day ended with an emergency, a community health worker ill with cerebral malaria whom we found being carried by her family the 20km from her home to the hospital. We put her in our Land Rover and she was successfully treated. It drove home the stakes - good supply chains here are a matter of life and death.

Read the complete story in The Harbus

 

Jet Airways lifts medicine, baby food for valley

A Jet Airways official said the airliner facilitated airlifting emergency relief (medicines and baby milk powder) free of cost from Delhi to Srinagar on its flight 3 SEP 08 following a request from an NGO.

Instantly, the airliner got approval from its general manager for North India, Nischal Bhasin, to airlift the humanitarian aid consignment free of cost. The medicine would be distributed in Government Medical College hospitals in Srinagar and districts hospitals across the valley. “We thought the consignments should go free of charge as the valley is facing problems due to lack of medicines,” said the official.

Read the complete story by Naseer A. Ganai for Greater Kashmir online