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Angel Sightings
September 12, 2008

 

Baylor's West African AIDS project perseveres

Building woes don't deter effort by doctors to help

Jean Sawadogo looks about 9, but he is actually 18. His growth was stunted by HIV. The Baylor College of Medicine's International Pediatric AIDS Initiative is helping the teen.
Alexis Grant / Houston Chronicle
Jean Sawadogo looks about 9, but he is actually 18. His growth was stunted by HIV. The Baylor College of Medicine's International Pediatric AIDS Initiative is helping the teen.

Eighteen-year-old Jean Sawadogo has the young face and small, frail frame of a boy half his age.

But the teenager, whose physical growth has been stunted by HIV, walks up the stairs at the hospital in Burkina Faso like he's 80, hoisting his swollen legs up one step at a time, supporting his weight on the handrail.

Doctors with Baylor College of Medicine's International Pediatric AIDS Initiative, who set up shop in Bobo-Dioulasso nearly two years ago, thought by now they would be treating patients like Sawadogo in their own facility with modern equipment, the first of its kind in West Africa.

But the project has been slowed by cultural difficulties as well as the remoteness of this landlocked country. And so the Baylor team still works out of a renovated wing of a government-run hospital, across town from the construction site.

Read the complete story by Alexis Grant for the Houston Chronicle

 

Zeiter honored for healing eyes, charitable work

When the San Joaquin Medical Society gathered last month to honor retired ophthalmologist Henry Zeiter with its lifetime achievement award, colleagues, family members, friends who shared his love of opera and classical music, and area lawmakers with proclamations in hand turned out 200 strong.

Missing were hundreds of others, people like his patients; college students in need, whose tuitions he helped provide; and the impoverished and homeless who were never denied his care. For as much as the 74-year-old Zeiter accomplished in his 40-year career - pioneering new procedures like the use of intraocular lenses for cataract patients and helping to establish Health Plan of San Joaquin County - his humanitarian work touched just as many lives, if not more.

Read the complete story by Lori Gilbert for The Stockton Record

 

Medical mission takes Air Force crews to Panama

Medical personnel at Maxwell Air Force Base who got into the profession to help people didn't lose that dream when they donned a military uniform. Members of the 42nd Medical Group volunteered to spend two weeks in Panama on a humanitarian mission. On the busiest day, the team of 15 American military physicians saw 1,400, patients, said John Henry, the medical readiness manager at the Maxwell clinic. They never saw fewer than 500 patients a day.

A variety of doctors make up the team, including family practice physicians, dentists, pediatricians, dermatologists and optometrists. The government of Panama augmented the American team with their own medical personnel and an ob-gyn to help screen and treat the flood of patients.

Read the complete story by Jenn Rowell for the Montgomery Advertiser